Social Security Disability for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) happens after seeing or going through a traumatic event involving injury or death, such as as accident, rape, abuse, killings, natural disasters or even a heart attack.  According to the MAYO Clinic PTSD symptoms may start within months of s traumatic event, but sometimes symptoms may not appear until years after the event.  These symptoms cause significant problems in social or work situations and in relationships. PTSD symptoms are generally grouped into four types: intrusive memories, avoidance, negative changes in thinking and mood, or changed in emotional reactions.  PTSD symptoms can vary in intensity over time.  Treatment for post traumatic stress disorder can involve counseling,  therapy, psychotherapy or a combination of many treatments. Disability claims for PTSD can be approved by disability claim examiners in two separate ways.  The first route for approval is for individuals whose medical records satisfy the requirements of Social Security’s disability listing on anxiety-related disorders.  The second means of approval is t get a “medial-vocational” allowance.  This may sound like it’s an exception but it’s actually the manner in which the great majority of SSD and SSI disability claims are approved. Not sure if you qualify?  Call Russ at 888-836-3898 or click here form more information.  Have some questions?  Take a look at our FAQ page....

10 Things You Should Know About Chronic Migraines and Applying for Social Security Disability

1. Focus on how your health issues prevent you from working.   Social Security does not care how sick you are; rather, they need to know why and how you are prevented from working. 2. Kill them with details.   3.  Get your doctors on board.   One of the biggest obstacles people face in the application process is care providers who do not respond to Social Security Administration inquiries.  It is very important for you doctors to cooperate with the process.  Talk to them early on in your application process. 4.  Make Copies of Everything 5. Start Collecting Information You should gather: Names, addresses and phone numbers of all doctors who have treated you. Chart numbers and insurance numbers. Dates you were seen by your doctors and dates you were treated. Names of medications Information about medical tests, you will need to know where you were tested. Medical records The jobs you worked in the 15 years before you became disabled, the dates you started and ended those positions. 6. Brainstorm your answers Brainstorm answers to the questions listed on the forms before you start filling them out.  It’s a bit like writing an essay for school: Think about what you want to say before you start writing. 7.  Ask people who know you well to review your answers and make suggestions of things you might have overlooked.  8.  Comply with all deadlines.  9.  Realize the wait time you can expect depends on where you live.  10.  Consider hiring a lawyer.  It is possible to apply for and receive benefits without assistance, but having help from someone who know the process well...

VA Expanded Benefits for Traumatic Brain Injury

In December of 2013, the Veterans Administration added five illnesses related to Service-Connected  Traumatic Brain Injury  Some veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who are diagnosed with any of five other ailments will have an easier path to receive additional disability pay under new regulations developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The new regulation, which takes effect January 16, 2014, impacts some veterans living with TBI who also have Parkinson’s disease, certain types of dementia, depression, unprovoked seizures or certain diseases of the hypothalamus and pituitary glands. Read the full article from the Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs here.   For more information about the resource available to you visit our Resource...

Social Security Statements available online

Not too long ago, we used to received our Social Security statements in the mail.  These statements contained information about earnings upon which you have paid Social Security taxes.  These statements gave you an estimate of the benefits you may have earned as a result. To save money, these statements no longer show up in your mailbox.  However, they are available online.  If you are considering a disability claim you can now go online to get a copy of the statement. This online tool is a handy way for you to see your estimated disability benefit should you become disabled along with other items such as estimates for family maximum benefits and estimated retirement benefits. To take a look at this online resource click here. To find out if you qualify for Social Security Disability for FREE click here....